Selenium Drops 50mL

Orthoplex

Selenium is an antioxidant and may help to support a healthy immune system. See your healthcare practitioner to determine if you need additional selenium.

Gluten Free
Egg Free
Dairy Free
Vegetarian
    Product Details

    Pack Size
    50 Liquid (ml)

    Adult Dose
    Take 1-2 drops daily, in water or juice, or as recommended by your healthcare practitioner.

    BIO

    Storage
    Store below 30°C in a cool, dry place, away from direct sunlight.

    Indications

      • Selenium is a major antioxidant trace element
      • Selenium is a co-factor of glutathione peroxidase
      • Selenium may help support a healthy immune system

      Contraindications

      • No contraindications
      • Suitable for use in pregnancy and lactation

      Contraindications are taken from Natural Medicines database and are correct as of March 2019.

    Excipients
    Ethanol, purified water.

    Warning
    This medicine contains selenium, which is toxic in high doses. A daily dose of 150 micrograms for adults of selenium from dietary supplements should not be exceeded. Contains ethanol.

    Ingredients

    Each dose contains

    Selenomethionine 25.0mcg
    equiv. Selenium 10.0mcg
    Drug Interactions
    Significance
    Ingredient
    Interaction Descriptions
    Moderate
    SELENIUM
    (Sodium selenite, Selenium, Selenomethionine)
    Be cautious with this combination.
    View Interactions:
    Moderate

    BARBITURATES

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Moderate

    BARBITURATES

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Moderate

    BARBITURATES

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Severity: moderate
    Occurrence: possible
    Level of Evidence: D

    Theoretically, selenium might prolong the sedating effects of barbiturates.<br> Laboratory research suggests that selenium can inhibit the hepatic metabolism of barbiturates (14601,14602). Selenium seems to prolong the sedative effect of pentobarbital in animal models (14601).

    References

    14601

    Debski B, Milner JA. Dietary selenium supplementation prolongs pentobarbital induced hypnosis. J Nutr Biochem 2004;15:548-53.

    14602

    Ishikawa M, Sasaki M, Koiwai K, et al. Inhibition of hepatic mixed-function oxidase enzymes in mice by acute and chronic treatment with selenium. J Pharmacobiodyn 1992;15:377-85.

    Moderate

    WARFARIN (Coumadin)

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Moderate

    WARFARIN (Coumadin)

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Moderate

    WARFARIN (Coumadin)

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Severity: high
    Occurrence: possible
    Level of Evidence: D

    Theoretically, selenium might interfere with warfarin activity. <br> Animal research suggests that selenium can increase warfarin activity. Selenium might interact with warfarin by displacing it from albumin binding sites, reducing its metabolism in the liver, or by decreasing production of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors (14541). Selenium can also prolong bleeding times in humans by increasing prostacyclin production, which inhibits platelet activity (14540).

    References

    14540

    Schiavon R, Freeman GE, Guidi GC, et al. Selenium enhances prostacyclin production by cultured endothelial cells: possible explanation for increased bleeding times in volunteers taking selenium as a dietary supplement. Thromb Res 1984;34:389-96.

    14541

    Davila JC, Edds GT, Osuna O, Simpson CF. Modification of the effects of aflatoxin B1 and warfarin in young pigs given selenium. Am J Vet Res 1983;44:1877-83.

    Moderate

    ANTICOAGULANT/ANTIPLATELET DRUGS

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Moderate

    ANTICOAGULANT/ANTIPLATELET DRUGS

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Moderate

    ANTICOAGULANT/ANTIPLATELET DRUGS

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Severity: high
    Occurrence: possible
    Level of Evidence: D

    Selenium may have antiplatelet effects and may increase the risk of bleeding if used with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs.<br> Clinical research suggests that taking selenium 10 mcg/kg/day can increase bleeding times by increasing prostacyclin production, which inhibits platelet activity (14540). Other clinical research suggests that taking selenium 75 mcg daily, in combination with ascorbic acid 600 mg, alpha-tocopherol 300 mg, and beta-carotene 27 mg, reduces platelet aggregation (74406).

    References

    14540

    Schiavon R, Freeman GE, Guidi GC, et al. Selenium enhances prostacyclin production by cultured endothelial cells: possible explanation for increased bleeding times in volunteers taking selenium as a dietary supplement. Thromb Res 1984;34:389-96.

    74406

    Salonen, J. T., Salonen, R., Seppanen, K., Rinta-Kiikka, S., Kuukka, M., Korpela, H., Alfthan, G., Kantola, M., and Schalch, W. Effects of antioxidant supplementation on platelet function: a randomized pair-matched, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial in men with low antioxidant status. Am.J Clin.Nutr. 1991;53(5):1222-1229.

    Moderate

    IMMUNOSUPPRESSANTS

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Moderate

    IMMUNOSUPPRESSANTS

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Moderate

    IMMUNOSUPPRESSANTS

    Be cautious with this combination.

    Severity: high
    Occurrence: possible
    Level of Evidence: D

    Theoretically, selenium supplementation may reduce the effectiveness of immunosuppressant therapy. <br> In vitro research and preliminary clinical evidence suggests that selenium may stimulate the immune system (74483,74445).

    References

    74445

    Peretz, A., Neve, J., Desmedt, J., Duchateau, J., Dramaix, M., and Famaey, J. P. Lymphocyte response is enhanced by supplementation of elderly subjects with selenium-enriched yeast. Am.J Clin.Nutr. 1991;53(5):1323-1328.

    74483

    Kiremidjian-Schumacher, L., Roy, M., Wishe, H. I., Cohen, M. W., and Stotzky, G. Supplementation with selenium and human immune cell functions. II. Effect on cytotoxic lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Biol.Trace Elem.Res. 1994;41(1-2):115-127.

    Minor

    NIACIN

    Be watchful with this combination.

    Minor

    NIACIN

    Be watchful with this combination.

    Minor

    NIACIN

    Be watchful with this combination.

    Severity: mild
    Occurrence: possible
    Level of Evidence: A

    Selenium might reduce the beneficial effects of niacin on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. <br> A combination of niacin and simvastatin (Zocor) effectively raises HDL cholesterol levels in patients with coronary disease and low HDL levels. Clinical research shows that taking a combination of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, and selenium) along with niacin and simvastatin (Zocor) attenuates this rise in HDL, specifically the HDL-2 and apolipoprotein A1 fractions, by more than 50% in patients with coronary disease (7388,11537). It is not known whether this adverse effect is due to a single antioxidant such as selenium, or to the combination. It also is not known whether it will occur in other patient populations.

    References

    7388

    Brown BG, Zhao XQ, Chait A, et al. Simvastatin and niacin, antioxidant vitamins, or the combination for the prevention of coronary disease. N Engl J Med 2001;345:1583-93.

    11537

    Cheung MC, Zhao XQ, Chait A, et al. Antioxidant supplements block the response of HDL to simvastatin-niacin therapy in patients with coronary artery disease and low HDL. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2001;21:1320-6.

    Minor

    CONTRACEPTIVE DRUGS

    Be watchful with this combination.

    Minor

    CONTRACEPTIVE DRUGS

    Be watchful with this combination.

    Minor

    CONTRACEPTIVE DRUGS

    Be watchful with this combination.

    Severity: insignificant
    Occurrence: possible
    Level of Evidence: B

    Contraceptive drugs might increase levels of selenium, although the clinical significance of this effect is unclear.<br> Some research suggests that oral contraceptives increase serum selenium levels in women taking oral contraceptives; however, other research shows no change in selenium levels (14544,14545,14546,101343). It is suggested that an increase could be due to increased carrier proteins, indicating a redistribution of selenium rather than a change in total body selenium (14545).

    References

    14544

    Heese HD, Lawrence MA, Dempster WS, Pocock F. Reference concentrations of serum selenium and manganese in healthy nulliparas. S Afr Med J 1988;73:163-5.

    14545

    Lloyd B, Lloyd RS, Clayton BE. Effect of smoking, alcohol and other factors on the selenium status of a healthy population. J Epidemiol Commun Health 1983;37:213-7.

    14546

    Capel ID, Jenner M, Williams DC, et al. The effect of prolonged oral contraceptive steroid use on erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity. J Steroid Biochem 1981;14:729-32.

    101343

    Fallah S, Sani FV, Firoozrai M. Effect of contraceptive pill on the selenium and zinc status of healthy subjects. Contraception. 2009;80(1):40-3.


    Full Reference List

    74445
    Peretz, A., Neve, J., Desmedt, J., Duchateau, J., Dramaix, M., and Famaey, J. P. Lymphocyte response is enhanced by supplementation of elderly subjects with selenium-enriched yeast. Am.J Clin.Nutr. 1991;53(5):1323-1328.
    74483
    Kiremidjian-Schumacher, L., Roy, M., Wishe, H. I., Cohen, M. W., and Stotzky, G. Supplementation with selenium and human immune cell functions. II. Effect on cytotoxic lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Biol.Trace Elem.Res. 1994;41(1-2):115-127.
    14540
    Schiavon R, Freeman GE, Guidi GC, et al. Selenium enhances prostacyclin production by cultured endothelial cells: possible explanation for increased bleeding times in volunteers taking selenium as a dietary supplement. Thromb Res 1984;34:389-96.
    74406
    Salonen, J. T., Salonen, R., Seppanen, K., Rinta-Kiikka, S., Kuukka, M., Korpela, H., Alfthan, G., Kantola, M., and Schalch, W. Effects of antioxidant supplementation on platelet function: a randomized pair-matched, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial in men with low antioxidant status. Am.J Clin.Nutr. 1991;53(5):1222-1229.
    14541
    Davila JC, Edds GT, Osuna O, Simpson CF. Modification of the effects of aflatoxin B1 and warfarin in young pigs given selenium. Am J Vet Res 1983;44:1877-83.
    14544
    Heese HD, Lawrence MA, Dempster WS, Pocock F. Reference concentrations of serum selenium and manganese in healthy nulliparas. S Afr Med J 1988;73:163-5.
    14545
    Lloyd B, Lloyd RS, Clayton BE. Effect of smoking, alcohol and other factors on the selenium status of a healthy population. J Epidemiol Commun Health 1983;37:213-7.
    14546
    Capel ID, Jenner M, Williams DC, et al. The effect of prolonged oral contraceptive steroid use on erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity. J Steroid Biochem 1981;14:729-32.
    101343
    Fallah S, Sani FV, Firoozrai M. Effect of contraceptive pill on the selenium and zinc status of healthy subjects. Contraception. 2009;80(1):40-3.
    14601
    Debski B, Milner JA. Dietary selenium supplementation prolongs pentobarbital induced hypnosis. J Nutr Biochem 2004;15:548-53.
    14602
    Ishikawa M, Sasaki M, Koiwai K, et al. Inhibition of hepatic mixed-function oxidase enzymes in mice by acute and chronic treatment with selenium. J Pharmacobiodyn 1992;15:377-85.
    7388
    Brown BG, Zhao XQ, Chait A, et al. Simvastatin and niacin, antioxidant vitamins, or the combination for the prevention of coronary disease. N Engl J Med 2001;345:1583-93.
    11537
    Cheung MC, Zhao XQ, Chait A, et al. Antioxidant supplements block the response of HDL to simvastatin-niacin therapy in patients with coronary artery disease and low HDL. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2001;21:1320-6.

    Rating System Description

    Level of Significance: Stop‑Light Rating System Occurrence/Severity
    Major

    Do not use combination; contraindicated; strongly discourage patients from using this combination; a serious adverse outcome could occur.

    Moderate

    Use cautiously or avoid combination; warn patients that a significant interaticon or adverse outcome could occur.

    Minor

    Be aware that there is a chance of an interaction; advise patients to watch for warning signs of a potential interaction.

    Likelihood of Occurrence

    Likely: Well‑controlled human studies have demonstrated existence of this interaction.

    Probable: Interaction has not been documented in well‑controlled studies, however interaction has been demonstrated in human studies or in controlled animal studies plus multiple case reports.

    Possible: Interaction has been documented in animal or in vitro research, or interaction has been documented in humans but is limited to case reports or conflicting clinical research.

    Unlikely: Interaction has been demonstrated in animal or in vitro research but has been shown not to occur in humans.

    Severity

    High: Life threatening or requires medical intervention to prevent a serious adverse event.

    Moderate: Worsened clinical status and/or requires medication adjustment.

    Mild: May cause minor clinical side effects. Unlikely to require medication adjustment.

    Insignificant: Drug or supplement levels may be affected but will not cause clinical effects.

    Level of Evidence

    A: High-quality randomized controlled trial(RCT).

    A: High-quality meta-analysis (quantitative systematic review)

    B: Nonrandomized clinical trial

    B: Nonquantitative systematic review

    B: Lower quality RCT

    B: Clinical cohort study

    B: Case-control study

    B: Historical control

    B: Epidemoilogic study

    C: Consensus

    C: Expert opinion

    D: Acecdotal evidence

    D: In vitro or animal study

    D: Theoretical based on pharmacology


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    Disclaimer: This information on interactions is licensed from the TRC Natural Medicines Database. Neither Bio Concepts nor TRC are providing medical, clinical or other advice and nothing should be interpreted as constituting such advice. Currently this does not check for drug-drug or supplementsupplement interactions. This is not an all-inclusive comprehensive list of potential interactions and is for informational purposes only. Not all interactions are known or well reported in the scientific literature, and new interactions are continually being reported. Input is needed from a qualified healthcare provider including a pharmacist before starting any therapy. Application of clinical judgement is necessary.